15 May 2024

Need to give your cat a tablet? Weybridge’s nurses break it down

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If you're wondering how to give your cat a tablet without getting scratched to pieces, you've come to the right place. Weybridge's experienced nurses are the perfect people to help you with this!

If, after reading our article, you have further questions or are not feeling confident in giving your cat a tablet at home, talk to our veterinary nursing team in Weybridge who will be happy to help.

Book to see a nurse

How to give your cat a tablet

Administering medication to your feline companion doesn't have to be a daunting task. With a variety of methods available, you can find the approach that works best for you and your cat. Here are five effective ways, tried and tested by our Weybridge veterinary nurses, to give a cat a tablet:

  1. Direct Administration: This involves placing the tablet directly at the back of your cat's tongue. Hold the tablet between your thumb and index finger, tilt your cat's head slightly upwards, and place the tablet deep into their mouth. Follow up with a gentle massage of the throat to encourage swallowing. This method won't be right for all cats and you may need a second person to hold your cat. If you think this will be too distressing for your cat and you are at risk of being scratched or bitten, our nurses advice for Weybridge cat owners, is to try one of the methods below instead.
  2. Crush & Mix: For cats who are finicky about taking tablets, crushing the medication and mixing it with their food can be a viable option. Ask our team whether your cat's medication is safe to crush, as some tablets are formulated for extended release and should not be altered. Mix the crushed tablet thoroughly with a small amount of their favourite wet food to mask any bitterness.
  3. Hide in Treats or Food: Another effective method is hiding the tablet in a high-value treat or food item. Choose a treat that your cat loves and carefully conceal the tablet inside. For example, you can use a small piece of cooked chicken or a dollop of tuna. Be sure to monitor your cat to ensure they consume the entire treat, including the hidden tablet.
  4. Pill Pockets: Pill pockets are specially designed treats with a hollow centre where you can insert the tablet. These treats are available in various flavours and textures, making them an appealing option for many cats. Simply place the tablet inside the pill pocket, pinch the ends to seal it shut, and offer it to your cat as a tasty snack.
  5. Liquid Medication: If your cat is particularly resistant to taking tablets, you can ask your vet if the medication is available in liquid form. Liquid medication can be easier to administer, especially for cats who are skilled at spitting out tablets. If liquid medication is available, our Weybridge veterinary team can provide you with a syringe or dropper to accurately measure and administer the prescribed dosage.

Experiment with these different methods to find the one that works best for your cat's individual preferences and temperament. Remember to always follow your vet's instructions regarding medication dosage and administration.

If you're unsure about the best approach for your cat, don't hesitate to talk to the nurses at our York Road vet practice for guidance and support. With patience and persistence, you can ensure that your cat receives the medication they need to stay happy and healthy.

Book to see a nurse

Before you go, May 2024 marks the 20th anniversary of Veterinary Nurse Awareness Month (VNAM), a month-long celebration of veterinary nurses everywhere for their hard work and commitment to providing the very best care for pets and owners. We know our nursing team would love to hear from you, so why not share how they've helped you and your pet on our Facebook page, with the hashtag #VNAM24

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